Monday, July 9, 2018: Field Recording
Woman searching a field kit while holding a boom microphone on a riverwalk.

Reading
Feaster, Patrick. “Phonography.”

9:45 a.m. Coffee and Easy Tiger Pastries
Location: PAR 102

10:00 a.m. Introduction and Welcome
Casey Boyle
We’ll introduce participants to the DFMI field notes and field reports assignments.
Location: PAR 102

10:30 a.m. Session 1: Overview of Recording Equipment
Will Burdette
We’ll look at various types of recorders. We’ll focus on handheld field recorders and their applications.
Location: PAR 104 (Keynote)

11:00 a.m. Field Recording: Campus
Participants will fan out across campus to experiment with recording gear, techniques, and spaces.

2:00 p.m. Session 2: Feedback from the Field
Participants will discuss their field recording experience.
Location: PAR 102

2:30 p.m. Session 3: Data Management
Sarah Welsh
When you’re working with a lot of material, learning to manage all your sound files can feel overwhelming. In this session, we’ll discuss how to get started with managing and properly saving your files and data during your time at DFMI and beyond.
Location: PAR 104
(keynote)

3:00 p.m. Optional Session: Audacity Crash Course
Casey Boyle
Location: PAR 104
Recommended Reading: The Book of Audacity

3:30 p.m. Coffee and Snacks from Central Market
Location: PAR 201

4:00 p.m. Keynote: Alex Keller, “Incendiary Sound Works: Concept and Execution”
Keller will review the process of solving a creative problem with an unique idea, refining the idea based on aesthetic concerns, and making it functional a practical concern, referring to his background in fine art, commercial sound design, hardcore music, and something approximating activism. He will touch on DIY tech, field recording, physical punishment, and finding the virtue of poor decision-making.
Location: PAR 201
(Keynote)

6:30 p.m. Reception at Gabriel’s Cafe
Participants are free to chat over a complimentary taco buffet and cash bar.

Additional Resources
July 9 Discussion Forum

Tuesday, July 10, 2018: Noises & Places
Hand holding a microphone on a rooftop with a city scape in the background.

Reading
Novak, David. “Noise.”

9:00 a.m. Coffee & Tacodeli Tacos
Location: PAR 102

9:00 a.m. Session 4: Sound Envelopes: Attack, Decay, Sustain, Release
Will Burdette
This session will go over the fundamentals of how a sound emerges and disappears over time.
Location: PAR 102

10:00 a.m. Session 5: Mics, Polar Patterns, Noise, Accessories, and Carriage
Will Burdette
We’ll discuss how and what microphones pic up, signal and noise, how to mitigate noise and how to carry oneself through the world with recording gear.
Location: PAR 104
(Keynote)

11:00 a.m. Field Recording: Republic Square Park to the Austin Public Library Central Branch
Field notes for field recording session 1.

3:00 p.m. Session 5: Feedback from the Field
Participants will discuss their field recording feedback.
Location: PAR 102

3:30 p.m. Coffee and snacks from Central Market
Location: PAR 203

4:00 p.m. Keynote: Marina Peterson, “Noise Annoys”
Annoyance, like noise, is atmospheric. It is noise’s atmospheric partner, the two entwined in a dance of indeterminacy, (un)grounding one another as they waltz across sensory, affective, discursive and technorational registers of science, engineering, law. An indeterminate term, its circulation is also atmospheric, a cloud or swarm of assumption, iteration, reiteration. For engineers, annoyance stands in for the subjective nature of noise, while for urban planners it carries the weight of nuisance law, of noise as a concern of property.
Location: PAR 203
(Keynote)

7:30 p.m. Encroachment @ Broken Spoke / South Lamar

Additional Resources
July 10 Discussion Forum

Wednesday, July 11, 2018: Alternative Fields
Brick staircase covered with rainbow light particles.

Reading
Erlmann, Veit. “Resonance.”

Mowitt, John. “Image.”

Sarah E. Truman and David Ben Shannon, “Queer-Sonic-Cultures

9:00 a.m. Coffee & Voodoo Doughnuts and Wholy Bagels.
Location: PAR 102

9:00 a.m. Session 6: Alternative Fields, Part 1
Justin Hatch
This workshop foregrounds alternative modes of listening and recording with hydrophones designed to capture sound in submersive environments less accessible to researchers. As piezoelectric materials used in hydrophones convert changes in pressure to electric signals, they can record vibrations of variable magnitudes, including some traditional sound moving through air. Yet, as the hydrophone’s impedance is matched to water and often submersed, ambient noises frequently go undetected, allowing for unique and isolated sounds both in and outside of water. The hydrophone highlights the role of impedance and ambience in sonic capture, creation, and representation.
Location: PAR 102
(Keynote)

10:00 a.m. Session 7: Alternative Fields, Part 2
Matt Breece
This workshop foregrounds alternative modes of listening and recording through electromagnetic and contact microphones. Electromagnetic microphones transduce the frequencies and wavelengths of electromagnetic fields into acoustic frequencies our ears can readily hear, allowing one to experience new sonic worlds of various common yet unheard electronics. And contact microphones are almost completely insensitive to air vibrations, unlike typical microphones, because they transduce only structure-borne sound—literally grounding sound by transducing physical vibrations into acoustic frequencies. These alternative forms of listening and recording orient us toward sound’s relational and transductive dimensions, amplifying its affective over its signifying aspects, tuning-in to the experimental, unfamiliar, and often unannounced.
Location: PAR 104
(Keynote)

11:00 a.m. Field Recording: The Picnic to Barton Springs
Field notes for field recording session 1.

3:00 p.m. Session 8: Feedback from the Field
Participants will discuss their field recording experience.
Location: PAR 102

3:30 p.m. Coffee and snacks from Central Market
Location: 2.102 Eastwoods Room in the Texas Union

4:00 p.m. Keynote: Byron Hawk, “Sonic Field Methods: From Gesture Ecologies to Genre Ecologies”
Counter-intuitively, Hawk argues for video as a method for researching sonic compositional practices. In a study of Thomas Stanley and his improvisational ensemble MOM2 (Mind over Matter, Music over Mind) Brian Harman, Tony Stagliano, and Hawk interviewed the group and filmed their performance. Videotaping their experimental sound art, even more explicitly than recording sound only, shows how the entanglements of performance and the gestures of compositional practice ground the emergence of larger scaled cultural productions such as genre, revealing how genre ecologies are ultimately functions of gesture ecologies.
Location: Eastwoods Room in the Student Union

6:30 p.m. Sound Walking @ Craftsman / East Cesar Chavez

Additional Resources
July 11 Discussion Forum

Thursday, July 12, 2018: Processing
Headphones against a blurry and bright backdrop.

Reading
Kapchan, Deborah. “Body.”

9:45 a.m. Coffee & Kolaches from Kolache Factory
Location: FAC 9

9:45 a.m. Session 9: Processing
Casey Boyle
Participants will discuss the various meanings of processing recordings and experiment with different techniques, software, filters, and workflows.
Location: FAC 9

10:30 a.m. Session 10: Sonification
Amy Charron
Sonification is the process by which researchers can take a natural process, a set of data, or any sort of non-sound signal, and convert it to sound. This technique systematically reflects the “objective” elements of data so that it can be tested against the real world by other researchers.
Location: PAR 102
(Keynote)

11:30 a.m. Session 11: Visualizing Sound
Sierra Mendez
The very first audio recorder, the phonautograph, was designed to represent sound visually for study in laboratories. In that tradition, we’ll look at various ways to represent sound visually–from waveforms to graphics to posters to album art to cutting-edge ways of compiling large and small amounts of sonic data.
Location: FAC 9

12:30 p.m. Session 12: Embellishing & Sound Design
Jake Cowan
Recording high quality audio is the first step toward innovative research in sound, but as any rhetorician can tell you, editing your material into a presentable form is just as important. This penultimate session will cover some of the final steps in audio production, from sound design to track mixing, teaching participants some of the best practices for putting disparate audio clips together in informative yet interesting ways. We will also cover copyright and fair use issues, creative commons and free music websites, how to pirate or bootleg audio.
Location: FAC 9
(Keynote)

1:00 p.m. Editing / Processing with Lunch from Central Market
Participants will work on field report projects.
Location: FAC 8, 9, 10, 14

6:30 p.m. Politics of Sound @ Scholz / Capitol

Additional Resources
July 12 Discussion Forum

Friday, July 13, 2018: Next Waves
Field notebook and pencil on top of sheets of paper with a person writing in the background.

Reading
Voegelin, Salomé. Excerpt from Sonic Possible Worlds: Hearing the Continuum of Sound.

9:00 a.m. Coffee & Central Market Tacos
Location: PAR 102

9:00 a.m. Session 13: Presentations and Next Waves
Casey Boyle
We’ll listen to everyone’s projects and talk about what sonic methodologies might add to the larger interdisciplinary conversation about digital field methods.
Location: PAR 102

Additional Resources
July 13 Discussion Forum

Adjourn